Category Archives: leadership

Colonial North American Project

Harvard Library is in the process of digitizing and releasing all known archival and manuscript materials in the Harvard Library that relate to 17th and 18th century North America. More information HERE.

Libraries, Communities and Design

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Image of Paseo Cayala, Guatemala

New Urbanism, or “living urbanism“, is a planning philosophy that strives to incorporate land use to create communities that foster the most desirable characteristics of human habitation (e.g. neighborliness, environmental sustainability, historic preservation, civic participation, etc.). Much urban design that styles itself as “newly urban” is crudely done, but when done correctly the design fosters a place and setting that is distinctly comfortable and human. Public (and academic) libraries in towns and urban communities that are interested in being a part of change, should consider new urbanist principles when designing or re-modeling physical spaces. For more information about new urbanism, the lecture by Andrés Duany at the Chicago Humanities Festival is a great start (see below).

Image credit to flickr.com/photos/christineghfranck/14490337445

Academic Librarians and Working Space

 

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Wiener Library in Camden Town, London, UK

The design firm Sasaki Associates released a 2015 survey, of more than 400 librarians at nearly 200 institutions, on their work spaces and here’s what they found.

 

Image credit to https://www.flickr.com/photos/peterhess/6021938898/in/photostream/

Library-Publisher Partnership at MIT

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Image credit to flickr.com/photos/cdevers/5702488800/

Under new direction, the Libraries and the Press are revisiting their own missions and core values, and have converged in part around the principle of adaptability. Namely, both organizations share the aims to actively engage in the changing technologies, practices and policies around creating and sharing information; embrace an entrepreneurial ethos that welcomes thoughtful risk taking and is not afraid to learn from failures; and adapt continually to the changing needs of the communities they serve…Read the rest.

Moving forward after professional rejection

In any profession, as in life, rejection will come. How we handle rejection is important, and  shares some great thoughts on how to handle professional rejection on a reject ACRLlog post.

Here’s a snippet: 
“Rejection comes in many forms, but the rejection that I am talking about is the type you get in this profession. Rejection of a proposal, job-position, book chapter, grant, or article. As a first-year academic librarian, the first year (so far) has been great, stressful, and eye-opening. I would not trade this for the world, but that also means accepting what comes with it.” Read the rest here.